From knowledge-creation to the perfecting of action: - Tao, Basho and pure experience as the ultimate ground of knowing [De la cration de savoir au perfectionnement de l'action: - Tao, Basho et exprience pure comme fondement ultime du savoir]

Submitted by James Miller on Sun, 02/22/2009 - 13:26
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TitleFrom knowledge-creation to the perfecting of action: - Tao, Basho and pure experience as the ultimate ground of knowing [De la cration de savoir au perfectionnement de l'action: - Tao, Basho et exprience pure comme fondement ultime du savoir]
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2003
AuthorsChia, R.(1)
JournalHuman relations (New York, NY)
Volume56
Pagination953
Date Published2003
PublisherKluwer Academic; - Plenum
ISBN Number0018-7267
KeywordsAction, Affaires, Alphabet, Asie du Sud-Est, Basho, Business, China, Chine, Correlation, Corrlation, Empirisme, English:: - Empiricism, Epistemology, Epistmologie, Experience, Exprience, French:: - Nant, Individu, Individual, Knowledge, Langage, Language, Metaphysics, Mtaphysique, Occident, Pense, Performance, Practice, Pragmatism, Pragmatisme, Pratique, Savoir, South-East Asia, Taoism, Theory, Thorie, Thought, Western countries, Zen
Abstract

The idea of knowledge-creation and knowledge management has become an important area of research in management studies. This preoccupation with the creation and accumulation of knowledge in its explicit representational form is underpinned by the epistemological priorities of an alphabetic-literate' culture that takes written knowledge as the only reliable basis for effective action. Documented knowledge necessarily precedes and hence determines action and performance. Such a metaphysical orientation precludes the possibility of attaining a form of direct unmediated knowing through the relentless perfecting of action. In traditionally based oral-aural communities or in non-alphabetic East Asian cultures knowing is more often achieved directly through the immediate engagement of tasks rather than through the acquisition of abstract written signs and symbols: - learning by direct observation and doing is the order of the day. Consequently, there is little systematic documenting and recording of knowledge in the written form that one finds in abundance in contemporary western cultures. Yet this apparent lack has not prevented such predominantly non-alphabetic eastern cultures from achieving outstanding levels of performance in the arts, sport and in business. This would suggest that the current obsession with knowledge-creation and the presumed route of knowledge-creation-application-performance is a peculiarly western preoccupation and that it represents only one avenue of possibility for achieving effective action. This has significant implications for our understanding of the relationship among knowledge, action and performance