ENVIRONMENT

New book on Daoist Cultivation

Submitted by LvKohn on Fri, 11/20/2015 - 07:23
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 Tao of Sustainability: Cultivate Yourself to Heal the Earth

 by Gregory Ripley

220 pages, paperback, fully illustrated, January 2016, ISBN 978-1-931483-31-5, US $34.95; PREPUBLICATION SPECIAL $27.50

www.threepinespress.com

the philosophy of qi in an era of air pollution

Submitted by James Miller on Sat, 05/25/2013 - 09:02
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In a recent column in Nature, Qiang Wang argues that responsibility for transforming China’s environment lies with its citizens. He points to several instances in which local protests have successfully prevented new industrial activity, and argues that this heralds the beginning of a new relationship between Chinese citizens, the state and the environment. China is…

daoist religion and ecotourism: a visit to maoshan

Submitted by James Miller on Thu, 09/02/2010 - 12:51
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In May this year I had the opportunity to visit Maoshan (Mt. Mao) a Daoist mountain sacred to the Shangqing (Highest Clarity) tradition of Daoism that I studied in my most recent book. Located in Jiangsu province, it is about an hour’s bus ride south of Zhenjiang, a stop on the main high speed railway from Shanghai to Nanjing. I was interested to visit Maoshan not only because of my historical research, but because it was the site of the Maoshan declaration, which in 2008 committed China’s Daoist Association to a ten year program of ecological protection.

new directions in religion and nature

Submitted by James Miller on Tue, 06/08/2010 - 12:27
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I was in LA last weekend to attend the Sixth Annual Conference on Daoist Studies which was organized by my former teacher, Livia Kohn, and LMU Professor Robin Wang. The conference drew the usual mix of academics and practitioners (which was itself the subject of an interesting meta-analysis by Elijah Siegler). My rationale for attending the conference, however, was that one of its focus themes was religion and ecology.

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