religion

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In June this year Ian Johnson published a major report in the New York Times on China’s plans to urbanize 250 million citizens over the next decade or so. This drive continues the decades-long story of China’s conversion from an 80 per cent rural society into an 80 per cent urban society, a migration that…

green spirituality and the limits to modernity

Submitted by James Miller on Tue, 06/26/2012 - 12:58
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In an online report on Religious Innovation for Sustainable Future (no longer available), Nina Witoszek (Oslo University) surveys a “pastoral renaissance” taking place across the globe. This renaissance, she declares, is “not just a tide of projects and conferences, but a new-old mindset which aspires to reclaiming nature, culture and spirituality, influencing green architecture and…

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A recent news story on Reuters, headlined Thou Shalt Not Launch IPOs, China tells temples, reports that the State Administration for Religious Affairs (SARA) has issued an injunction against temples listing on the stock exchange. SARA official Liu Wei is reported as staying: Such plans “violate the legitimate rights of religious circles, damage the image…

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The question of how to promote a culture of ecological sustainability in China took me this summer to conduct exploratory fieldwork among the Blang minority nationality, in Yunnan province, close to the border between China and Myanmar. The Blang are…

Call for Papers

Submitted by James Miller on Wed, 07/27/2011 - 13:19
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Daoism: Religion, History and Society

Call for Papers

While studies on Daoism have grown very fast over the past few decades, they do not have a distinct identity of their own within the larger academic world, and up to now lack a forum where concerned scholars can debate and further define the state and the future of the field. Thus, the Centre for Studies of Daoist Culture (The Chinese University of Hong Kong) and the École française d’Extrême-Orient have joined their efforts in creating this academic journal: Daoism: Religion, History and Society.

researching religious values for ecological sustainability

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